Swings and Roundabouts
Sometimes you just have to film, wrote, take photos and reblog.
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i am angry

The thing you hear adults call teenagers the most after ‘lazy’ is angry.
Why are you so angry?

The other day I was making a scrapbook for a school assignment and I was reading newspaper articles for it. The first thing I find is an article about the water crisis and global warming and hey, if we don’t do anything then in a couple of years a billion more people will lack access to water!
The we is my generation.

A few flicks later the journalist comments on the ‘situation’ in Gaza, links it to Egypt and Libya and Palestine, and I read through the deaths as a crying little girl watches me from the top of the page. ‘The conflict is ongoing, but the UN is hesitant to interfere’, because we all know the situation can only worsen and then ‘we’ can deal with it.

I drop the newspaper and turn to magazines- after a moment, side to side, lie an article informing women on what is too prudish and what is to slutty and a column about what kind of girls to go for during the holidays.
Here, there is no ‘we’, because there is no problem in sight.

On my phone I am assailed by reports from Ferguson, but the shock is not great because I’ve gotten used to the tear gas and images of dead black kids labeled criminals by the people meant to protect them.

Then there is news on the economic crisis.

Why am I angry?

Because if you say wars, women repressed, economic crisis and black people horribly mistreated, I won’t be able to tell if you’re talking about 1930 or 2014, unless you add in pollution and overpopulation.

I am angry because we are called lazy when we are under more pressure than anyone before us.

I am angry because we are called materialistic. We don’t want the Lamborghini, we want a job!
We don’t want a mansion, we want peace- for a day, a week, please!
We don’t want a giant TV, we want someone to patch up the hole in the ozone layer, or maybe give us some equality, but that someone won’t be the ones who created this mess!

I am angry because I am 80% disillusioned, 10% worried and 10% hoping for the bright future we were lead to hope for until we realized we were meant to make it happen!

I am angry because when the world’s problems aren’t ignored, the world is criticized, and no one bothers to think that they have made it this way!

I am angry because I can say sexism, racism, homophobia, war, disease, pollution, and go on for years, but the older generation will prefer to call us the selfie generation than do anything to fix them!

I am angry because #yolo is trending without knowing that it’s true because we don’t know if we’ll even have a chance at a future.

I am angry, yes, because you have messed up this world for us to fix, but I don’t know if we can fix it.

But yeah, ask me again why I’m angry.

— a few words typed without thinking (via am-artist)
“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

I’m looking at you
bro
In the “Cool story babe, now make me a sandwich” t-shirt
The commonly uses
“I raped you faggot”
when playing
Video games
To dehumanize
Your straight friends
The white kid who greets his buddies with the n-word
Who’s OkCupid dating profile describes him as a “nice guy”
He’s just sick of getting friend-zoned
Because being just friends with a woman
Is so terrible
Nevermind the fact that he answers yes to the following:
Are women obligated to shave their legs?
Are racist jokes funny?
When a woman is raped, is it sometimes her fault?

I’m looking at you
guy in every women’s studies class ever
who derails dialogue
About a third of the world’s population of women
Who will be raped
In their life times
By asserting
“the wage gap isn’t real”
the guy who starts “PimpWalk” in response
to slutwalk
a demonstration aimed at ending victim blaming
of rape victims
the guy with the “no fat chicks” bumpersticker on his F150
whos confused why
he cant get pussy
to the guy who calls anal rape
“surprise buttsex”
to the one who uses “feminazi”
as a frequent part
of his vernacular
to every guy who has ever thought that a facebook status
about domestic violence
was a good opportunity to practice playing the
devils advocate

to every guy
boy
man
who has ever dismissed feminism
because it didn’t involve him
to every man who has ever raped a woman
to every man who has ever beaten one
isolated one
belittled one
dehumanized one
to every guy
who thinks he’s not like those ones
because
its just a joke
to every guy who is confused why feminists hate him


to every guy
its because
you’re part of a problem
a culture
that won’t stop choking us
but tells us
to just breath

coolvintagesoul:

I hope this sinks in your hearts.

draumstafir:

rogerrrs:

i wanna go for walks in the middle of the night but i also dont want to die ya feel

just girly things

é  82494  û    —    10:25am

A thought experiment: Imagine how people might react if Taylor Swift released an album made up entirely of songs about wishing she could get back together with one of her exes.

We’d hear things like: “She can’t let go. She’s clingy. She’s irrational. She’s crazy.” Men would have a field day comparing her to their own “crazy” exes.

Yet when Robin Thicke released “Paula” – a plea for reconciliation with his ex-wife Paula Patton disguised as an LP — he was called incoherent, obsessed, heartfelt and, in particular, creepy.

But you didn’t hear men calling him “crazy” — even though he used it as the title of one of tracks.

No, “crazy” is typically held in reserve for women’s behavior. Men might be obsessed, driven, confused or upset. But we don’t get called “crazy” — at least not the way men reflexively label women as such.

“Crazy” is one of the five deadly words guys use to shame women into compliance. The others: Fat. Ugly. Slutty. Bitchy. They sum up the supposedly worst things a woman can be.

WHAT WE REALLY MEAN BY “CRAZY” IS: “SHE WAS UPSET, AND I DIDN’T WANT HER TO BE.”

“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

Most men (#notallmen, #irony) aren’t abusers, but far too many of us reflexively call women crazy without thinking about it. We talk about how “crazy girl sex” is the best sex while we also warn men “don’t stick it in the crazy.” How I Met Your Mother warned us to watch out for “the crazy eyes” and how to process women on the “Crazy/Hot” scale. When we talk about why we broke up with our exes, we say, “She got crazy,” and our guy friends nod sagely, as if that explains everything.


Except what we’re really saying is: “She was upset, and I didn’t want her to be.”

Many men are socialized to be disconnected from our emotions — the only manly feelings we’re supposed to show are stoic silence or anger. We’re taught that to be emotional is to be feminine. As a result, we barely have a handle on our own emotions — meaning that we’re especially ill-equipped at dealing with someone else’s.

That’s where “crazy” comes in. It’s the all-purpose argument ender. Your girlfriend is upset that you didn’t call when you were going to be late? She’s being irrational. She wants you to spend time with her instead of out with the guys again? She’s being clingy. Your wife doesn’t like the long hours you’re spending with your attractive co-worker? She’s being oversensitive.

As soon as the “crazy” card is in play, women are put on the defensive. It derails the discussion from what she’s saying to how she’s saying it. We insist that someone can’t be emotional and rational at the same time, so she has to prove that she’s not being irrational. Anything she says to the contrary can just be used as evidence against her.

More often than not, I suspect, most men don’t realize what we’re saying when we call a woman crazy. Not only does it stigmatize people who have legitimate mental health issues, but it tells women that they don’t understand their own emotions, that their very real concerns and issues are secondary to men’s comfort. And it absolves men from having to take responsibility for how we make others feel.

In the professional world, we’ve had debates over labels like “bossy” and “brusque,” so often used to describe women, not men. In our interpersonal relationships and conversations, “crazy” is the adjective that needs to go.

— Men really need to stop calling women crazy - Harris O’Malley (via hello-lilianab)